Monday, November 25, 2013

Creating a dog-friendly garden

One of the joys of every dog lover is having a home garden to play fetch with the furry friend. But this may not always be a good idea. 

For your dog and garden to coexist in harmony, the process should involve teaching him a few tricks as well as landscaping your garden to fit your dog’s needs.

Dogs, being dogs, may run over your favorite patch of flowers or you might have unknowingly planted some harmful plants in your garden. As a responsible pet owner, you should be able to create a safe environment for your pet. For your dog and garden to coexist in harmony, the process should involve teaching him a few tricks as well as landscaping your garden to fit your dog’s needs. 

Create clear pathways around the garden and edging around beds. This would indicate a visual signal to your dog to keep off the flowers and to stay on the pathways. You should also train your dog to stay away from the flowerbeds with the help of treats and the occasional admonishment. Protect delicate flowers by using sturdier plants along the borders of flowerbeds. If this still doesn’t work, you might have to resort to installing low picket fences. 

Provide paw-friendly surfaces for your dog to walk and run on. Soil can get muddy after a rainy downpour, and flat surfaces can get hot really fast under the midday sun. Lay out pea gravel on the pathways instead. 

Think of your dog’s needs as you design your garden. Leave some spaces open as “dog park areas” where you can play fetch with your dog. Make your garden comfortable for your dog by providing shade with trees and a water bowl at the ready. 

Finally, check the plants in your garden to create a safe and nurturing environment. Research on different garden plant varieties, and be wary of poisonous varieties. Some common plants such as “dumb cane” or dieffenbachia and lilies are dangerous to animals. Also, be careful not to use pesticides and other chemicals that may prove to be unhealthy for your dog. Don’t leave your garden tools lying about. Store them in your garage or tool shed instead, as sharp tools can cause injuries, and rusty ones pose the risk of tetanus. - Aislinn Kee 


Previous Next

Share
Email

Top Articles

Small spaces: Decor t...
Need a little more leg space in your living room? Use scaled-down sofas, arrang...
Home decor: Tips to c...
Even if you’re on a tight budget, it’s possible to completely transform a room ...
Buying Lots in Valenz...
Our partner is buying several properties in areas in Valenzuela, Quezon City, B...
Tips for designing th...
With imagination and clever design, you can encourage your family to spend more...
Buying Lots in QC, Va...
Our partner is buying several properties in Quezon City, as well as the cities ...
More property news...